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"Little Enna" is an ancient Toran folk song. It tells the story of Enna, a little girl who finds a smooth stone on the shore. The stone turns out to be an egg, which hatches a "sweet sea worm." When Enna shows her mother the worm, she commands her daughter to take it back to the sea. Enna is saddened and runs away, declaring that if the worm belongs to the sea, she does as well. As she is running, a burst of water comes out of the rock and drags her into the earth. No one knows what happened to Enna, but many believe that the worm grew into the dreaded monster known as "the Glus" or "Death Spinner." The final verse of the song reads:

Since that sad day, long years have flown,
But still, beneath that seething foam
Where Enna sleeps,
The sea-worm creeps,
And spins its webs of bone-white stone.[1]

History Edit

The Maze of the Beast has been known since ancient days and is part of Toran folklore. However, "Little Enna" is over a hundred years older than the first tales of the Maze of the Beast. Compared to other Toran songs, "Little Enna" has no great beauty. The song was believed by most scholars to be simply a warning to disobedient children; however, the palace librarian Josef stated in his book that he believed it contained a grain of truth like most folktales. He believed the song told the origin story of the Glus.[1]

References Edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Rodda, Emily. The Deltora Book of Monsters. Scholastic Australia. 2001.

See also Edit

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